Understanding Anxiety

Why am I so anxious?
Are you anxious talking in front of a group, getting on an airplane or going to a doctor? Do you experience racing heart, shortness of breath shakes or sweating? If so, you may have a typical anxiety response.

Human beings are designed to respond to danger by either flight, fight or freeze. In the modern world, our biological impulse to run, bite or freeze can create unpleasant consequences. Panic, racing heart, shortness of breath, tightness in chest, dizzy, sweating, shaky, emotional, trouble sleeping, relaxing, eating, etc. We don’t want to freeze taking a test, run from an interview or have road rage.

At times, we can get ourselves all worked up, even before we give a speech or board a plane. Sometimes these tense adrenalin pumped responses stay with us long after a challenging event has passed.

Individuals who grew up in a stressful family environment, or were handed down a sensitive nervous system via genetics, or played too much with drugs, or experienced some other form of trauma can find themselves with an unwanted overly sensitive, anxious, stressful mind and body.

Changes on one level may be sufficient. However, at times looking at two or more levels (multi-modal) will yield a better result.

Treating the whole person
The “B.A.S.I.C. I.D” as defined by Dr Arnold Lazarus, Ph.D., creator of Multimodal Psychotherapy considers the whole person.

B = Behavior
A = Affect
S = Bodily Sensation
I = Interpersonal Relations
C = Cognition
I = Self Image
D = Biological and Drug processes

Each of these seven dimensions act, react, and interact with one another. A clear understanding of how the individual relates within one’s social and physical environments can reveal many things about the person.

A well trained therapist who listens with an experienced ear, an open mind and a compassionate heart will have an excellent chance to know what is going on, and what to do